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Urea

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DosArroyos
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Urea

Postby DosArroyos » Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:13 pm

What are the pros and cons of Urea being in or out of protein lick tubs.

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Faster horses
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Re: Urea

Postby Faster horses » Wed Feb 13, 2019 7:27 pm

Are you asking for range cattle or feedlot? It makes a difference, because it takes a lot of energy to digest urea and energy
is short in winter range conditions; speaking about the northern parts of the country.

A little urea doesn't hurt, but to have too much in winter climates, your cattle could stand and shivver because they
don't have the energy to digest it, robs energy from their body....which is what keeps them warm.

Urea was first designed for feedlot use, where energy is supplied on a daily basis.
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DosArroyos
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Re: Urea

Postby DosArroyos » Wed Feb 13, 2019 9:29 pm

I'm wondering about use as a range tub.I'd call my country central West Texas.Pasture is improved grasses which was fresh CRP 38 years ago,but is now overrun with small to medium Mesquites and cactus.

Texan
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Re: Urea

Postby Texan » Thu Feb 14, 2019 5:59 am

I use the simple rule of thumb that if I have plenty of dormant grass or am putting out enough hay, cattle will get enough energy, given proper protein supplementation. If you don't have enough dormant grass or hay, you'll be better off using a natural protein supplement that will also provide some energy, such as range cubes/cake, a better quality hay, etc. That said, I always prefer natural protein and don't mind spending a little extra to get it. With a tub, though, you'll never get the high protein levels without using the NPN's.

Basically, if you have enough dormant grass, the NPN/urea supplied in a protein tub will help supply enough protein for them to get the energy they need, but you still have to answer some more questions to know if that will be enough. For your purposes, the question you have to ask yourself is whether or not they can consume enough of the tubs to get the protein they need. That is going to be dependent upon whether or not you're talking about yearlings, wet cows, dry cows, etc. With dormant grass, it's often difficult for a wet cow to consume enough protein from a tub to give her what she needs.

Protein tubs are the poorest bang for the buck with your protein dollar, though. I see a lot of protein tubs that cost close to $1,000/ton. As much as I'd like to use them for the convenience, I just can't justify that in most cases. But in some cases, we don't have choices, and if you're not out there every day or at least once per week, you might have to bite that bullet.

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Re: Urea

Postby Faster horses » Thu Feb 14, 2019 1:34 pm

[quote="DosArroyos"]I'm wondering about use as a range tub.I'd call my country central West Texas.Pasture is improved grasses which was fresh CRP 38 years ago,but is now overrun with small to medium Mesquites and cactus.[/quote]

There probably isn't enough 'desirables' in your pasture, meaning forage that cattle desire to eat. Is there any green showing?
I assume you are wanting to get your cattle to eat the 'junk' in your pasture. Are these bred cows, nursing cows, yearlings? What
are they?

I agree with Texan (except that liquid supplement is the highest cost per pound of protein of all). I like all-natural tubs and he's right on the high cost of convenience. Really, a 28% protein tub with say, 8% urea,
most nutritionists would throw out the 8% urea and you would have 20% protein. If they are to eat 2# of the molasses based lick and you don't take anything out for moisture (because moisture has no nutrients, but I don't know the moisture content of the tubs you are considering so can't figure it) you have .20 x 2# = .4 # of protein at the max. Take out 10% for moisture and you have .18 x 2# = .36# of protein. Is that enough to do any good?

My suggestion would be to get some alfalfa hay, put it out at 5-10# per head per day and put it out twice a week.
You will get a lot more nutrition for your money.


Hope this helps. Good luck!
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true.


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