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Common Core

Posted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 8:42 am
by lavacarancher
Anyone know anything about subject? I just had a teacher explain some of the concepts of common core math and I'm not so opposed to the method as I used to be. The technique uses the same principal as used in electronic analog to digital conversions. And has been for several decades. I just wanted to know if any of the smarter (than me) folks had an opinion. Oh yea, it's not hard to be smarter than me.

Discussion?

Re: Common Core

Posted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 1:55 pm
by Workinonit
I would love to hear others responses, experiences with it.

I know very little about it, other than it seems to give many people, fits! What few common-core math problems I've seen, they made no sense at all to me. On a couple of them, the answer could have been almost anything, 3 or 4 different answers. I found that puzzling.

Re: Common Core

Posted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 3:31 pm
by lavacarancher
Workinonit wrote:I would love to hear others responses, experiences with it.

I know very little about it, other than it seems to give many people, fits! What few common-core math problems I've seen, they made no sense at all to me. On a couple of them, the answer could have been almost anything, 3 or 4 different answers. I found that puzzling.


Same here. In fact my response was that the "answer" to any given math problem was not anywhere close enough to be useful. I could see sending a man to Mars using common core math to plot his trajectory and missing his target by several light years because the answer wasn't even in the ball park.

So, here's what I have learned. Let's use a very simple division math problem, 12 divided by 4. Bear with me. OK, how many times will 4 go into 12? Kids answer is "I don't know"
Well, it will go one time, yes?
Kids answer, yes.
Put a one down and subtract 4 from 12
Kids answer, remainder is 8
OK, so how many times will four go into 8?
Kids answer, "I don't know"
Well it will go one time, yes?
Kids answer, yes.
Put another one down and subtract 4 from 8, answer 4
So how many times will 4 go into 4?
Kids answer, one time with a remainder of zero. Yes, put the one down.
So how many ones have you written down? Kids answer 3
Answer to 12 divided by 4 is 3.

Very simplistic description but when I realized what was going on I was struck by lightning. This technique is called (in electronics) "successive approximation" and has been used for decades to convert an analog "signal", for example to a digital answer. Stated another way if you wanted to know the digital equivalent of 10 volts you would do the same process as above by comparing the unknown analog voltage to a reference voltage. If the 10 volt signal was above or below the reference voltage you would create a "one" or a "zero" depending on the result of the comparison. The remainder (residual) would be compared to the reference and again create a one or zero depending on the comparison and so on until you have reached the limits of your A(nalog) to D(igital). With this method one could create a digital equivalent of an analog signal down to less than a tenth of a microvolt and even this depends on your reference voltage and the resolution (how many bits) your A/D has.

Re: Common Core

Posted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 7:27 pm
by Workinonit
That is very interesting, how it is similar to the electronics process.

As I was reading your reply, I was thinking that it seemed so complicated to arrive at the answer. In fact, I could see where I would have gotten it wrong, using that process. My mind always trying to 'think ahead', yet I've never been very good at math, especially complicated math. How does it work for simple addition and subtraction? Do you know if this common-core method has proven to be especially useful for kids with dyslexia or other learning issues?

I wonder if it came about because of the similarities to the example you gave regarding electronics or did the common core come first (specifically for the electronics)

Re: Common Core

Posted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 6:29 am
by highgrit
Common core math doesn't work, kids don't know how to count money. The retailers are fixing that problem with just one swipe though.

Re: Common Core

Posted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:37 am
by lavacarancher
Workinonit wrote:That is very interesting, how it is similar to the electronics process.

As I was reading your reply, I was thinking that it seemed so complicated to arrive at the answer. In fact, I could see where I would have gotten it wrong, using that process. My mind always trying to 'think ahead', yet I've never been very good at math, especially complicated math. How does it work for simple addition and subtraction? Do you know if this common-core method has proven to be especially useful for kids with dyslexia or other learning issues?

I wonder if it came about because of the similarities to the example you gave regarding electronics or did the common core come first (specifically for the electronics)


Don't know but I can tell you I've been in the electronics business for more that 60 years and the "successive approximation" technique has been employed for all of that time to convert analog into digital.

I don't know about other states but in Texas they don't even teach cursive writing anymore. It's all either printed or type written (printer written - typewriters are a thing of the past).

As far as comparing common core to SA its exactly the same. For example is four higher than twelve, if not then 1; if yes then 0. Compare 4 to the remainder (8). Is 4 higher than 8, if not then 1; if yes then 0. And so on. You see the similarity now? The correct answer is 11111100 in digital compliment form or three in decimal.

I just thought it was pretty interesting that something seemingly so complicated (and wrong) turns out to be fairly easy and accurate.

You are right High. Kids these days can't make change without looking at the computer. Shame.

Re: Common Core

Posted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 4:41 am
by redrobin
Regular math was in use when our country's people were better at math.

Re: Common Core

Posted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 3:17 pm
by lavacarancher
redrobin wrote:Regular math was in use when our country's people were better at math.


Maybe there's connection? :lol:

Re: Common Core

Posted: Sun Oct 08, 2017 1:11 pm
by backhoeboogie
It is all fine and dandy until you hand someone cash at the ice cream store. Your change is 42 cents and they give you back 4 dimes and 2 pennies.

Kids these days have no idea how to count back your change. They just tell you what the register says you get.